OUR THERAPIES

gir playing with blocks

SPEECH THERAPY

A Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) is skilled in research, prevention, evaluation, treatment and counseling of the full range of human communication and its disorders. These disorders may include congenital, developmental, and acquired disorders of speech, voice, resonance, fluency, phonology, swallowing, language, and cognitive-communication. SLPs work with individuals of all ages from infants to the elderly.
 

A Speech-Language Pathology Assistant (SLP-A) may execute specific components of a speech and language program as specified in treatment plans developed by a SLP.  Under supervision of a SLP, goals and objectives listed on the treatment plan are implemented by the SLPA when the SLP has determined the SLPA has the training and skill to perform.
 

Our Speech-Language Pathologists provide evaluation, treatment, and consultation in the following areas: 
 

  • Expressive Language

  • Receptive Language

  • Articulation (Sound Production)

  • Social Skills

  • Oral Motor Skills

  • Feeding Therapy

  • Voice Disorders

  • Fluency Disorders

  • Phonemic Awareness

  • Cognitive Training

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

An Occupational Therapist (OT) empowers families to create opportunities for their child with special needs to function as independently and successfully in their daily routine as is possible. A child's "occupation” is play, sleeping comfortably, eating to meet their nutritional needs, and learning to take care of themselves. It is our goal to be sure the child can be a successful contributing member of their family and community. Occupational Therapists utilize behavioral, sensory, and therapeutic interventions to teach the family to address the functional needs of the child and their family.
 

Our Occupational Therapists provide evaluation, treatment, and consultation in the following areas: 
 

  • Motor Skills

  • Sensory Processing

  • Motor Planning

  • Neuromuscular Function

  • Strength/Endurance

  • Oral Motor Skills

  • Self Help Skills

  • Visual Perception

  • Visual Motor Development

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

An Occupational Therapist (OT) empowers families to create opportunities for their child with special needs to function as independently and successfully in their daily routine as is possible. A child's "occupation” is play, sleeping comfortably, eating to meet their nutritional needs, and learning to take care of themselves. It is our goal to be sure the child can be a successful contributing member of their family and community. Occupational Therapists utilize behavioral, sensory, and therapeutic interventions to teach the family to address the functional needs of the child and their family.
 

Our Occupational Therapists provide evaluation, treatment, and consultation in the following areas: 
 

  • Motor Skills

  • Sensory Processing

  • Motor Planning

  • Neuromuscular Function

  • Strength/Endurance

  • Oral Motor Skills

  • Self Help Skills

  • Visual Perception

  • Visual Motor Development

PHYSICAL THERAPY

A pediatric Physical Therapist (PT) works with children 0-18 years old and their families to assist children of all abilities to fully participate in activities at home, school and community, and play.  A pediatric therapist is skilled in examining, evaluating and diagnosing in the areas of movement dysfunction and motor development.  The PT will then tailor specific interventions to meet the needs of the child and family. 

Our pediatric PTs focus on the following:
 

  • Independent Mobility

  • Increasing participation in all activities of the child and family

  • Promote motor development

  • Promote health and wellness through addressing:

    • Strength

    • Endurance

    • Balance

    • Coordination

    • Flexibility 

DEVELOPMENTAL SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONISTS (DSI)

Special instruction is complementary, not duplicative, to other early intervention services (Childress, 2004).   The services provided by a DSI go beyond child-centered teaching and general parent education and requires a distinct set of knowledge, skills and experience. 

 

DSIs have knowledge in:

  • Typical and atypical patterns of infant/toddler development and learning in all domains

  • Functional assessment of development across domains

  • Developmental disabilities in the birth-to-three population

  • Specialized instructional strategies to help young children learn

 

Our DSIs focus on the following:

  • Promoting caregiver-child interaction

  • Facilitating the capacities of families to adapt routines and activities to support child learning and interaction

  • Integrating all areas of development for a holistic view of the child

  • Utilizing adult learning approaches to support the caregiver’s competence and confidence in meeting the child’s needs

  • Understanding how cultural diversity affects family interactions and intervention practices

  • Using effective teaming practices to collaborate with families and other professionals within and across agencies. 

SERVICE COORDINATION

Service Coordinators work with families and teams in the process of determining eligibility in the Arizona Early Intervention Program (AzEIP).  They assist families with assessing supports and services for their child birth to 3 years of age and provide on-going support to families and children during service delivery through transition out of early intervention at age 3.
 

Our Service Coordinators support their teams and families by:
 

  • Coordinating the process of evaluations and assessments to determine eligibility.

  • Assisting families in identifying available agency and community supports and services.

  • Coordinating and monitoring the delivery of available services.

  • Coordinating with community resources, medical and health providers.

  • Facilitating the development of a transition plan for preschool services, if appropriate.